(Source: jevisailleurs)

Someone buy me a faux fur coat pretty please? :’) ♥

Someone buy me a faux fur coat pretty please? :’) ♥

wavybaby2001:

eee princess smoke time

wavybaby2001:

eee princess smoke time

(Source: hollydainty, via wannyy)

my-loof-is-on-fire-desu asked: heyo~ i'm stuck with developing my character's attributes, etc. i want her to be outspoken on issues (gender/sexuality, oppression and such), and who is pretty confident in some scenarios but i also want her to have some form of social anxiety, so she's more realistic as a character. any advice on how to achieve a character who's somewhat of an extrovert, but has social anxiety? thanksyou~

characterandwritinghelp:

Far be it from me to rule on this as an intensely introverted individual. Extroversion is so far out of my ballpark, it’s in another zipcode. Here are some links for you to peruse instead:

Best of luck.

-Headless

theatlantic:

These Genius Dolphins Are Using Sea Sponges As Tools

The first thing to know is that dolphins can be divided into two groups, and those groups are ”spongers” and ”non-spongers.” The non-spongers are the dolphins that are probably the ones you think about when you have occasion to think about dolphins: smooth, sleek, nimbly darting through the water. 
But the spongers! The spongers are slightly less physically nimble, but possibly much more intellectually nimble, than their fellow cetaceans. And that’s because, as they swim, they carry sea sponges in their beaks—an activity that may help to protect their sensitive snouts from sharp rocks, stingrays, urchins, and other things that might plague them, particularly as they forage for food along the seafloor. Dolphin sponging is a recent discovery: In 1997, scientists observed a group of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins engaging in the practice in Shark Bay, off the coast of Australia.
The behavior, Justin Gregg notes in his book Are Dolphins Really Smart?, has since been traced back to approximately 180 years ago, to a single female who has been nicknamed “Sponging Eve.” Scientists now believe that more than 60 percent of all female dolphins in the area practice sponging. And while the behavior seems to be transmitted for the most part along mother-daughter lines, as many as half of the males born to “spongers” in the area grow up to become spongers, too.
Read more. [Image: Hugh Pearson/Naturepl.com]

theatlantic:

These Genius Dolphins Are Using Sea Sponges As Tools

The first thing to know is that dolphins can be divided into two groups, and those groups are ”spongers” and ”non-spongers.” The non-spongers are the dolphins that are probably the ones you think about when you have occasion to think about dolphins: smooth, sleek, nimbly darting through the water. 

But the spongers! The spongers are slightly less physically nimble, but possibly much more intellectually nimble, than their fellow cetaceans. And that’s because, as they swim, they carry sea sponges in their beaks—an activity that may help to protect their sensitive snouts from sharp rocks, stingrays, urchins, and other things that might plague them, particularly as they forage for food along the seafloor. Dolphin sponging is a recent discovery: In 1997, scientists observed a group of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins engaging in the practice in Shark Bay, off the coast of Australia.

The behavior, Justin Gregg notes in his book Are Dolphins Really Smart?, has since been traced back to approximately 180 years ago, to a single female who has been nicknamed “Sponging Eve.” Scientists now believe that more than 60 percent of all female dolphins in the area practice sponging. And while the behavior seems to be transmitted for the most part along mother-daughter lines, as many as half of the males born to “spongers” in the area grow up to become spongers, too.

Read more. [Image: Hugh Pearson/Naturepl.com]

Packing for Saturday! I cannot contain my excitement! ♥♡♥

Packing for Saturday! I cannot contain my excitement! ♥♡♥

theolduvaigorge:

Study suggests H. erectus used toothpicks for oral hygiene

Laura Martín-Francés, a researcher from the National Research Centre on Human Evolution, has co-authored a paper published in Quaternary International that describes several teeth that bear evidence of toothpick use from the Middle Pleistocene site of Yiyuan in China.

by Agencia Sinc/translated from Spanish
“Laura Martín-Francés, a researcher from the Dental Anthropology Group in the National Research Centre on Human Evolution (CENIEH), has collaborated with a team from the Institute of Vertebrate Palaeontology and Palaeoanthropology (IVPP) in Beijing in a recently published article in Quaternary International. The authors propose that they have found evidence for first instance of toothpick by Middle Pleistocene hominids from Eastern Asia. They concluded that the striae resulted from the intentional removal of food debris from the teeth.
The article is an analysis of dental microwear; the authors microscopically focus on the interproximal surfaces of Homo erectus fossil teeth discovered in 1981-1982 at Yiyuan, a site in the Shangdong Province of China. The striae were identified in five of the seven teeth that were analysed, which belonged to three individuals.
Binocular microscopes and Scanning Electron Micropes are used to identify microwear on teeth…The location, morphology, and size of these grooves are similar to artificial damage caused by regular use of toothpicks.
Earliest striations
These striae would be the earliest incidence of toothpick use yet found in the Asian palaeoanthropological record. Such evidence has been suggested in other species: Homo habilis (African Plio-Pleistocene), Homo heidelbergensis (European Middle Pleistocene) and Homo neanderthalensis (European Upper Pleistocene).
Laura Martín-Francés has already published a paper on the earliest evidence of toothpick marks in Europe in an analysis of the dental pathologies of a ~1.2 My Sima del Elefante (Atapuerca) specimen.
Hypotheses suggested to be the cause of these toothpick striations include: oral hygiene, removal of food trapped between teeth, relief of pain caused by dental disease and personal habit. As concerns the Yiyuan specimens, the article concludes that the marks resulted from extraction of food debris caught between the teeth. Martín-Francés explained that the teeth did not bear evidence of pathological conditions, “but that pathology cannot be completely ruled out as no associated mandibular or maxillary fragments have been recovered.”
***Perhaps I was unable to properly translate certain technical information from this article but some of it seemed incorrect so I left it out. Also H. habilis? I don’t recall hearing about such a study. And although there are limitations to what we can say about long term anything from microwear analyses, methods have been steadily improving that limit interobserver error and reduce subjectivity. Nevertheless, I’ll take Occlusal Fingerprint Analysis any day. I’m a morphology girl at heart, I guess.
(Source: Agencia Sinc)

theolduvaigorge:

Study suggests H. erectus used toothpicks for oral hygiene

Laura Martín-Francés, a researcher from the National Research Centre on Human Evolution, has co-authored a paper published in Quaternary International that describes several teeth that bear evidence of toothpick use from the Middle Pleistocene site of Yiyuan in China.

  • by Agencia Sinc/translated from Spanish

Laura Martín-Francés, a researcher from the Dental Anthropology Group in the National Research Centre on Human Evolution (CENIEH), has collaborated with a team from the Institute of Vertebrate Palaeontology and Palaeoanthropology (IVPP) in Beijing in a recently published article in Quaternary International. The authors propose that they have found evidence for first instance of toothpick by Middle Pleistocene hominids from Eastern Asia. They concluded that the striae resulted from the intentional removal of food debris from the teeth.

The article is an analysis of dental microwear; the authors microscopically focus on the interproximal surfaces of Homo erectus fossil teeth discovered in 1981-1982 at Yiyuan, a site in the Shangdong Province of China. The striae were identified in five of the seven teeth that were analysed, which belonged to three individuals.

Binocular microscopes and Scanning Electron Micropes are used to identify microwear on teethThe location, morphology, and size of these grooves are similar to artificial damage caused by regular use of toothpicks.

Earliest striations

These striae would be the earliest incidence of toothpick use yet found in the Asian palaeoanthropological record. Such evidence has been suggested in other species: Homo habilis (African Plio-Pleistocene), Homo heidelbergensis (European Middle Pleistocene) and Homo neanderthalensis (European Upper Pleistocene).

Laura Martín-Francés has already published a paper on the earliest evidence of toothpick marks in Europe in an analysis of the dental pathologies of a ~1.2 My Sima del Elefante (Atapuerca) specimen.

Hypotheses suggested to be the cause of these toothpick striations include: oral hygiene, removal of food trapped between teeth, relief of pain caused by dental disease and personal habit. As concerns the Yiyuan specimens, the article concludes that the marks resulted from extraction of food debris caught between the teeth. Martín-Francés explained that the teeth did not bear evidence of pathological conditions, “but that pathology cannot be completely ruled out as no associated mandibular or maxillary fragments have been recovered.”

***Perhaps I was unable to properly translate certain technical information from this article but some of it seemed incorrect so I left it out. Also H. habilis? I don’t recall hearing about such a study. And although there are limitations to what we can say about long term anything from microwear analyses, methods have been steadily improving that limit interobserver error and reduce subjectivity. Nevertheless, I’ll take Occlusal Fingerprint Analysis any day. I’m a morphology girl at heart, I guess.

(Source: Agencia Sinc)

officialfallinginreversefans:

Ronnie Radke of Falling In Reverse is on the Cover of Kerrang Magazine. You can check out a sneak peak of it here.

officialfallinginreversefans:

Ronnie Radke of Falling In Reverse is on the Cover of Kerrang Magazine. You can check out a sneak peak of it here.

"I mean what’s a normal week without your life falling apart 2 or 3 or 19 times"

wuglife:

This is a neat article that discusses the reasons certain words are taboo. It reminded me of an article from a few years about about what the effect of swearing was, or why we swear when we get hurt or upset. (Swearing helps relieve and cope with pain.) It seems like these two things are quite related: by connecting an arbitrary set of sounds or symbols to a taboo, we give the word emotional power. Then, we can use the emotional power of the word to help control and direct our own emotions. It’s sort of a Rube Goldberg machine of the mind!

(Source: psychologyofsex)

redbimbo:

Forest run

redbimbo:

Forest run